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What is the most beautiful work you have conducted?

Here we go...let me know what you feel is the most beautiful work you have conducted, a cappella or with piano.  It can be for SATB, SSAA, or TTBB or any combination.  Everything I am listening to in new music sounds like some poor imitations of Eric Whitacre or Veljo Tormis.  OK...Go!
Replies (89): Threaded | Chronological
on January 15, 2016 9:08pm
Last movement of Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms. Unless it is the Thompson, Alleluia in the right acoustic and occasion. But then it could be Diraiton. S
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 15, 2016 9:34pm
Josquin:  Ave Maria… Virgo Serena
Mozart:  Ave Verum
Stravinsky:  Ave Maria
 
Hope that helps!
Michael A. Gray
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 16, 2016 9:17am
Hello Casey
 
Benjamin Britten's Ceremony of Carols, tied with Franz Biebl's Ave Maria, each of a different type of musical 'beauty'.
 
donald
Applauded by an audience of 2
on January 16, 2016 9:56am
Bogoroditse Devo - Rachmaninoff Vespers
Applauded by an audience of 8
on January 17, 2016 9:49pm
Lst year I conducted the NC All State Women's Choir singing Gwyneth Walker's Tree of Peace. When they sang the phrase, "Then shall the shackles fall" it could have been one of my favorite musical moments ever. It is available SATB or SSAA. Wonderful piece by one of my favorite composers. 
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 19, 2016 2:54am
Hello Laura!  Question - The SSAA version is "Out of Print".  Would you happen to have a copy of it that I could "borrow"?  I am at chayes(a)franklincollege.edu.  We performed Walker's "So Many Angels" and my students loved it!  I would appreciate any help!  Best, Casey
on January 20, 2016 9:48pm
I found the SSAA listed on JW Pepper.  Item # 10045670. Published by EC Schirmer.  But I am glad to be introduced to such a great piece!
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 31, 2016 4:21am
Thank you so much!  I did find it after all and have it in my posession.  It looks and sounds amazing!  I just love Walker's music!
on February 20, 2016 7:36am
Harold Brown's OOP Choral Settiing I (1940) of JMHopkins"No Worst there is none-pitched past pitch of grief" (SSAA) can be seen/heard at http://www.RenaissanceChorus.org
It alway stirs, although sad.
SIR
on January 19, 2016 3:57am
Although I have conducted several of the suggestions mentioned above, I would name with no hesitation: J.S.Bach: Jesu meine Freude - 11 movement - mottet for SATB (a cappella, but instruments may double the choir parts)
All the best
Marilena Zlatanou 
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 19, 2016 4:54am
C V Stanford - Beati quorum via.
Applauded by an audience of 4
on January 19, 2016 7:49am
Definitely Egil Hovland's STAY WITH US.  
                              t
Applauded by an audience of 2
on January 19, 2016 2:57pm
The Buxtehude Magnificat Anima Mea. A short work for SSATB with string ensemble, and we added a harpsichord. A beautiful musical gem.
Applauded by an audience of 1
on February 20, 2016 7:40am
Also his ATB with 2 vln/recorders&continuo "Apirita Mihi Portas Justitae " is a small gem!
SIR
on January 19, 2016 6:12pm
Barter - Michael Eglin
O Magnum Mysterium - Lauridsen
Ave Verum Corpus - Raminsh
Sicut Cervus - Palestrina
 
These have all been with a high school a cappella choir.
on January 20, 2016 4:56pm
Randall Thompson's Alleluia!!!!!
Applauded by an audience of 3
on January 21, 2016 3:34am
Dear Casey,
 
Visit the archives of the feature "Favorite piece of the month" of Musica database www.musicanet.org . This feature goes on since 1998! There are brilliant jewels in there!
And do not forget: if you are a member of ACDA, you benefit from a full privileged access to Musica when accessing through www.acda.org -> Membership resources...
Jean Sturm
Applauded by an audience of 2
on February 7, 2016 5:33am
I had NO idea about this, Jean!  Thank you so very much for the information.  I hope others will read this and learn as well!  Best, Casey
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 21, 2016 5:06am
I am not the conductor of our choir but the two most beautiful pieces we've performed are Stanford's "Bluebird" + Jaako Mantyarvi's "Die Stimme de Kindes."
on January 21, 2016 12:34pm
Zounds! I was not remotely expecting a mention in this thread!
 
--
Regards,
Jaakko Mäntyjärvi
Helsinki, Finland
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 22, 2016 5:06am
We've done it twice. Our music director is looking at some of your music for next season.
on February 19, 2016 12:05pm
Check out Mantyjaarvi's Akari (Light).  It is so beautiful!  For SSA though.  Here is our choir doing it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7Rhfq5FwvY
 
We are a choir in Canada and some of our favourite works are by Canadian composers such as Sarah Quartel (her Requiem will be published by Oxford Press soon) and Don MacDonald (eg Tabula Rasa).  Absolutely beautiful.
Applauded by an audience of 1
on February 19, 2016 2:21pm
I am pleased to note that my Akari (Light) is available for SSA, TBB and SSATBB. The publisher is Sulasol.
(A second piece mentioned! The mind boggles.)
 
--
Regards,
Jaakko Mäntyjärvi
Helsinki, Finland
Applauded by an audience of 2
on January 31, 2016 4:23am
That's the beauty of the "list"...isn't it wonderful to know what you produced is viewed by so many as the most beautiful work they have conducted?  I strive for that feeling!  Congratulations!  Best, Casey
on January 21, 2016 6:00am
A challenging question!
To the above I would add:
J. Aaron McDermid: From Light to Light, mvt 1 - Earth
Michael McGlynn: Mariam Matrem Virginem
Samuel Barber: Agnus Dei
on January 21, 2016 9:15am
The Lotti "Crucifixus" or perhaps the Biebl "Ave Maria."
Michael Larkin
Applauded by an audience of 4
on January 21, 2016 9:41am
My current favorite is HOMELAND by Stroop. 
Applauded by an audience of 2
on January 22, 2016 2:59am
What a lovely thread!  Carissimi - Plorate Filii Israel does it for me
DT
Applauded by an audience of 3
on January 22, 2016 9:56am
The Poet Sings - SSA - Z. Randall Stroope
Adaramus Te - SSA - Palestrina
Lord You are Near Me - SA - Mark Patterson
 
I was honored to be able to conduct these pieces in Honolulu and London with the Amarillo Youth Choirs. One I conducted in St. Pauls Cathedral. What an awesome, humbling experience. Thank you, Jerry and Katrina Perales, for those wonderful moments you enabled me to have, and for impacting so many young singers with your own love of music and singing. You teach all of us with your leadership, on and off the poduim. You are loved.
on January 22, 2016 12:01pm
Two of my favorites are Lauridsen's "Lux Aeterna" and "Sure On This Shining Night."
 
AD
Applauded by an audience of 3
on January 22, 2016 7:58pm
It's a little like being asked, "What is your favorite piece/style?" It's a shifting target. But...for pure beauty, the Faure Requiem, or Taverner's "Dum transisset sabbatum" would certainly be in the top few.
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 23, 2016 8:14am
Crossing the Bar.  Gwyneth Walker
Psalm 23.  Randall Stroope
The First Noel.  Dan Forest
Applauded by an audience of 2
on January 23, 2016 8:48am
Way too difficut a question!!! Recently, though: "I thank You God for most this amazing day" (Whitacre)
on January 23, 2016 12:50pm
SINGLE MOVEMENT WORKS
#1.  Samuel Barber's Agnus Dei (Adagio for strings)
#2. Gabriel Faure's Cantique de Jean Racine.
#3. Brahms' Nanie.
#4. Tomas Vittoria's O magnam mysterium
#5. Jean Berger's The Eyes of all wait upon Thee 
#6.  My own Lord's rayer (not yet punlished, but, nevertheless, composed and performed)
 
EXTENDED WORKS:
A.  Gabriel Faure's Requiem in d-moll (an extended work)
B. Karl Jenkin's Peacemakers  (a work of 17 movements)
C. Mozart's Requiem in d-moll.
D. Brahms' Ein Deutsches Requiem.
E. Ralph Vaughan Williams' Five Mystical Psalms.
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 23, 2016 2:44pm
I am deeply touched by these and am always thrilled and humbled to be able to teach and conduct them.... 
 
SSA
Pergolesi: Stabat Mater
Srul Irving Glick: Psalm 23 (from his Psalm Trilogy)
Pablo Casals: Nigra sum
Eleanor Daley: The Lake Isle of Innisfree
 
SATB
Fauré: Cantique de Jean Racine
Fauré: Requiem (especially the Agnus Dei)
Victoria: O magnum mysterium
Duruflé: Ubi caritas
 
I am enjoying seeing everyone’s list!
Pat Abbott
Montreal
 
 
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 23, 2016 7:50pm
It's hard to pick a favorite, but what comes to mind right now are the Pizzetti 2 composizioni corali.
on January 23, 2016 8:56pm
I've been reading this thread with delight and fascination. It's led to a lot of thought about the meaning of "beauty" (vs., for example, "prettiness"), and the persistence of the experience of beauty via brief contact -- as with a relatively short, single-movement piece -- as opposed to the depth of experience that can only be achieved in a lengthy, massively imposing work.
 
For me, there is no experience of beauty that can compare with the arrival of the final "dona nobis pacem" at the end of the Missa solemnis' Agnus Dei (Beethoven), or both the first bar of the final movement -- preparing "Selig sind die Toten" -- and the final statement of those words (the first an implied recollection of the opening movement, the second a literal one) in Brahms' deutsches Requiem, or the "Dona nobis pacem" of the B-minor Mass, so different in affect from the Gratias, which it quotes. The mountain has been climbed, our destination is in sight; while there is still much work to be done we can finally feel certain of ultimate success. Whenever I conduct any of these it's difficult to keep from breaking down in tears at those points: joy mingled with sorrow.
 
Jerome Hoberman
Music Director/Conductor, The Hong Kong Bach Choir & Orchestra
Applauded by an audience of 4
on January 24, 2016 4:06am
Some of my favourites have already been mentioned on here - one that I have not yet had the pleasure of conducting (but hope to one day) is 'There is Sweet Music' by Elgar. It's an 8-part masterpiece, with the men in G major and the women in Ab (and it sounds divine). 
 
David Squire 
Music Director, New Zealand Youth Choir
Applauded by an audience of 2
on January 27, 2016 5:20am
Another Elgar gem is the short but effective "The Shower."
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 24, 2016 4:18am
Good Morning, Gang!
When I started this thread, I thought that maybe two or three of you would contribute..I am thrilled AND much more educated as a result of this conversation, which I thank you from the bottom of my heart.  As a "50-ish" choral conductor of both semi-professional and collegiate ensembles, I have been finding myself falling back into a state of repitition of my favorite works, largely due to not knowing the entire choral repertoire (does ANYONE know the entire choral repertoire???)  I thank you all for helping me learn more works, and, more importantly, discuss the meaning of beauty which, in my very humbel opinion, must include the experience of the singer.  Here is my brief, yet beautiful list of some of my favorites:
 
SATB - John Rutter - GLORIA & Blow, Blow Thou Winter Wind
         - David Childs - Weep No More (ANY vocal setting...superb!)
         - Ola Gjello - The Lake Isle
         - Lauridsen - Dirait-on
         - Brahms - Lieberlieder Waltzes
         - Barber - Agnus Dei
         - Vaughn-Williams - Serenade to Music
         - Lotti -  Crucifixus
         - Glinka - Travelling Song
         - Whitacre - Set Me As A Sea
         - Bernstein - Make Our Garden Grow from Candide
 
SSAA - Stroop - Psalm 23
          - David Childs - Prayer of St. Francis
          - Loomer - Away from the Roll of the Sea
          - Gwenyth Walker - So Many Angels
          - Edenroth - Bumble Bee
          - Pfausch - Annunciation
 
TTBB - Randol Bass - Gloria
         - Martin - Give Us A Song
         - McCoy - Come Ye Thankful People Come
         - Rutter - For the Beauty of the Earth
         - Orff - "In Taberna" from Carmina Burana
         - Rachmaninoff - Bogoroditze Devo
         - Manuel - Alleluia
         - Mendelssohn - Barcarolle (Dudley arr.)
         - Adams - Musica
         - Justin Dello Joio - I Carry Your Heart (manuscript - published in 2016)
 
Just a few...this is HARD!  Thank you all, and let's keep it going!  Best, Casey
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 24, 2016 7:19am
These are wonderful lists to have!  I feel very fortunate to be performing Fauré's exquisite Requiem (Patricia, my fave is also the Agnus Dei;) and his Cantique de Jean Racine, amongst other works at our May 7th concert.  (I noticed that these Fauré masterpieces are mentioned in several submissions here.)  
 
Casey, just a quick clarification re: Away from the Roll of the Sea (part of your SSAA list): The composer of this beautiful piece (which our choir has performed on many occasions) is Cape Breton, Nova Scotia's Allistair MacGillivray.  Diane Loomer is the arranger of the SSAA and TTBB versions.
 
More favourites for the list: Bach: Mass in B Minor, St. Matthew Passion; Lauridsen: Sure on this Shining Night; Daley: In Remembrance; Gjeilo: Northern Lights, and so many more...
 
Jenny Crober,
Art. Dir./Conductor, VOCA Chorus of Toronto
www.vocachorus.ca
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 31, 2016 4:09am
Thank you, Jenny!  Please forgive my error.  I did know this, but it escaped me when I was writing my list.  
on February 8, 2016 4:14am
Hi Casey,
I'm rather embarrassed to admit that I'd initially thought the title of this thread was "What is the most beautiful work you have performed"... so I responded (on Jan. 24th) as both a conductor and a chorister.
 
I've conducted the gorgeous Lauridsen, Gjeilo, Daley and McGillivray selections mentioned (above) in my list of favourites, along with many other glorious and varied works over the past 12+ years, and will gladly add the Bach Magnificat and Healey Willan's Rise Up, My Love to that list!
 
As a performer, I've sung the 2 major Bach works I'd mentioned: the Mass in B Minor and the St. Matthew Passion.  Each performance of these masterworks made a huge and lasting impression upon me as a musician.  
 
Thanks again for inititating this wonderful thread!  
 
Jenny Crober
Art. Dir./Conductor, VOCA Chorus of Toronto
www.vocachorus.ca
on January 25, 2016 3:01am
Lovely list! May I suggest This Worldes Joie by Arnold Bax. Hard piece but one of the loveliest ever! 
Applauded by an audience of 3
on January 26, 2016 6:10am
The best work I have ever conducted is "The Majesty and Glory of Your Name" by Fettke.  It is very moving with so many dyanmic levels; beautiful structured phrases; and dramatic lines.  Yet, it ends in a whisper.
 
Sharon J. Willis
Applauded by an audience of 1
on February 18, 2016 3:23pm
Tom Fettke was my high school choir director!  What an amazing teacher, and now I direct choirs!  Funny how that works! 
 
on January 26, 2016 8:53am
Lay a Garland (Robert Pearsall)
Applauded by an audience of 3
on January 26, 2016 9:44am
The Ground by Ola Gjeilo
Applauded by an audience of 4
on January 26, 2016 10:53am
Would have to be Rise Up My Love by Healey Willan.  I love this piece, it works really well with large groups and smaller ones too.  It's one of our favourites that I'm sure we will perform again.
 
Jen Balfour
Director, Choralation A Cappella
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 27, 2016 12:19pm
Robert Parsons - Ave Maria
William H. Harris - Faire is the Heaven
William Mundy - Vox Patris caelestis
Applauded by an audience of 2
on February 7, 2016 12:32pm
HI Frederick,
 
Great!! - Yes we are performing Parson's Ave Maria right now - one of the most expressive Renaissance motets. Thanks for reminding me!
 
Jim Marvin
Applauded by an audience of 2
on January 29, 2016 3:54am
Surprisingly good choices here.    Ms/Mr Casey, your own list imo is the weakest, so delve in what's offered here in all richness. 
on January 29, 2016 12:24pm
I fail to see how a list with Rutter, Gjeilo, Brahms, Barber, Bernstein, Rachmaninoff, etc. could be seen as musically weak...
Applauded by an audience of 6
on January 29, 2016 1:38pm
Thank you, Clay.  Perhaps Mr. William Copper does not understand the question.  I asked what YOU considered the most beautiful; I did not ask to judge anyone else's list.  I stand behind my list.  However, do know that the reason I asked this question in the first place was to learn...I want to learn what others consider and know to be beautiful beyond the reach of one person, free of judgement and intellectual snobbery.  I have learned SO much about repertoire from this discussion, and hope to keep learning as it continues.  Thank you all, and let's keep it coming so that everyone may continue to learn.  Best, Casey (Mr. Casey J. Hayes, Ph.D.)
Applauded by an audience of 6
on January 30, 2016 6:15am
Mr. Copper,
Please re-read the initial question that started this thread: WHAT IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL WORK YOU HAVE CONDUCTED? The quetion has to do with what the person who conducted the music thinks, not what you think about their opinion. Their favorites are just as legitimate as yours. The thread is intended for sharing one's favorite works, not eliciting your criticism of their choices.
Applauded by an audience of 5
on January 29, 2016 12:26pm
Stroope - Psalm 23
Forrest - The First Noel
Gjeilo - The Ground
McDonald - Be Still
Brumfeld - No Time
Lange - Esto Les Digo
Hogan - Hear My Prayer
Bernon - She Sings...
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 29, 2016 1:21pm
As a singer, "Seek the Lord" by Rene Clausen and "The Majesty and Glory of Your Name" by Tom Fettke.
on January 29, 2016 1:45pm
Karl Jenkins: Requiem for SATB chorus, orchestra and shakuhachi (Japanese flute). Movements alternate between the traditional Latin requiem mass and settings of haiku (in Japanese) that reflect on the impermanence of life.
on January 30, 2016 4:57am
Faure Pavanne--Absolutely the most beautiful melody ever written. I heard an arrangement for chorus and orchestra. Favorite Renaissance motet: Palestrina Tu es Petrus. Favorite madrigal: Lassus Matona mia cara. Brahms German Requiem 6th movement. Vaughan Williams Dona nobis pacem "Dirge for Two Veterans". (I break down every time I sing, conduct, or hear these last two.) More contemporary: Durufle Ubi caritas. Nice to see Stroope pieces on this list. I need to add his I Am Not Yours.
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 30, 2016 7:08am
I think Clausen is wonderful, and the SSAA Set Me As a Seal is so beautiful that it hurts!!
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 30, 2016 11:11am
Maybe a tie:  Herbert Howells:  Hymnus Paradisi ...  Johannes Brahms: German Requiem.
on January 30, 2016 1:45pm
How Do I Love Thee? by Eric Nelson.  That song changes lives!
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 30, 2016 5:54pm
James Mulholand's Red, Red Rose and numerous others of his compositions have been beautiful favorites for decades.
S
Applauded by an audience of 2
on January 31, 2016 4:18am
I love a capella! My favorite pieces would be:
 
O Magnum Mysterium. Morton Lauridsen
Sing Me To Heaven. Daniel E. Gawthrop
Lux Beatissima. Howard Helvey 
 
Kari Morris
 
Applauded by an audience of 1
on January 31, 2016 5:42am
I forgot about Gawthrop! "Mary Speaks" is another tear-jerker!
on January 31, 2016 4:46am
You simply must consider Five Hebrew Love Songs Whitacre.
Dennis Houser, Prescott Chorale, Prescott AZ
Applauded by an audience of 2
on January 31, 2016 1:56pm
There are so many from which to choose! Currently, I am working on an SATB a cappella arrangement by Gil Aldema of Sheleg Al Iri ("Snow On My City"), written by Naomi Shemer, which I think is simply beautiful. 
Applauded by an audience of 1
on February 1, 2016 6:06am
What a great list of music!  This is tough but I wanted to add that I am currently conducting two different pieces by Susan LaBarr.  Hope Is A Thing With Feathers (SSA) and Grace Before Sleep (SATB).  Great potential cross-curricular / team teaching with your English department because of the wonderful poetry!  
Applauded by an audience of 1
on February 2, 2016 6:57am
Paul Manz, "E'en So, Lord Jesus, Quickly Come."
on February 2, 2016 7:12am
In addition to many titles listed, I'd add:
Debussy: "Dieu, qu'il la fait bon regarder"
Mulholland:  "If Love Should Count You Worthy"
Barber:  "The Coolin" 
Bob Boyd
on February 8, 2016 10:31am
Second that on the Debussy AND on the Barber!
on February 3, 2016 8:14am
May I add for SSAA and harp, Gustav Holst's "Choral Hymns of the Rig Veda", Opus 26.  
Bob Boyd
Applauded by an audience of 1
on February 4, 2016 2:00pm
Vaughan Williams "O Taste and See".
Stainer's "God So Loved the World" (from the 'Crucifixtion". 
on February 5, 2016 6:27am
Sing Me to Heaven by Daniel Gawthrop
on February 6, 2016 8:53am
HI Casey,
     Ockeghem, Alma redemptoris Mater; Josquin, Sanctus of MIssa Gaudeamus; TTBB Tallis, Lamentation of Jeremiah; Tomkins, When David Heard; Brahms, movement #3 of Fest und Gedenksprüche (BEST), Bruckner, Os justi; Rachmaninoff, Bogo roditze Devo; Stanford The Blue Bird.
     Major Works: Monteverdi Vespers of 1610; Bach St. Matthew Passion; Beethoven, Missa Solemnis; Brahms Requiem; Stravinsky Symphony of Psalms
Applauded by an audience of 2
on February 7, 2016 3:57am
SAA
Modal Etudes by Veljo Tormis
Nocturne from Six Songs of Carl Sandburg by Miklos Kocsar
 
SATB
All Night Vigil by Rachmaninov
 
four part canon
Like a Stream Gently Rolling by Gyorgi Ligeti
 
not a choral work but from one:
Solo
Erbarme Dich, Mein Gott by JS Bach
on February 7, 2016 5:54am
Hi  Casey- excellent post!  I enjoy reading other conductors' most beautiful choral works!  For me, the most beautiful work I've conducted is Palestrina's "Sicut Cervus" (prima pars). Sometime soon I would love to prepare and conduct a program of Psalm settings, and this work would certainly be at the top of the list! 
Carl Smith, Ph.D. 
on February 7, 2016 7:56am
Some works for double chorus:
 
Lassus Tui sunt coeli; O bone Jesu
Brahms Ich aber bin elend, Op. 110, Nr. 1
 
Two contemporary works (SATB)
Esenvalds O salutaris hostia
Rolfe Come, lovely and soothing death
on February 8, 2016 7:48am
Wow, Casey. This has been a tremendous thread. Thanks for starting it. Such a treasure house of beautiful choral works. Besides the work that I have already posted, I would like to add: Byrd's Ave verum Corpus and the soprano, alto Den Tod from Bach's Christ lag in Todesbanden BWV 4.
Thanks again.
Applauded by an audience of 1
on February 9, 2016 7:47am
What a wonderful collection of pieces. Thank you Casey for starting us on this journey of reflection and discovery. As a community choir director, I tend to find favorites in each program I build. Even within a program, as I go though rehearsals from week to week my favorites change. This past fall's concert was like that, but certainly my current "in my head" favorite is Gwyneth Walker's setting of the Tennyson poem, "Crossing the Bar". 
on February 19, 2016 10:45am
Ditto for Walker's "Crossing the Bar."
 
Eriks Esenvalds   "Only in Sleep"
Stephen Paulus  "Hymn to the Eternal Flame"
Roman Hurko   "Bogoroditse Divo"
Dan Forrest   "Goodnight Dear Heart" 
on February 20, 2016 7:21am
not generally the conductor, but ocasionally  in our Friday sight reading groups near Columbia (since c.1951)  ' collaborate' with co-conspiritors singly-how about the famous Singers Prayer:Compere Omnioum bonorum (c.1472), Lassus Sacrae Lectiones novem des Hiob, esp. VII 'Spiritus meus'/VIII 'Scio Einim...", & Timor et Tremor, Josquins' Stabat Mater, Praeter Rerum seriem & its parodied Lassus Magnificat, and deRore Missa, and [coming up 3/25/16-] the 580 year old Dufay Nuper rosarum flores, Dunstaple Veni sancti Spiritus, and Johannes Martini Magnificat & Salve regina.
SIR
on February 21, 2016 7:03am
John Rutter SATB "The Lord Bless You and Keep You"
Redards from Montevideo, Uruguay
Coro del Colegio Inglés de Montevideo
Prof.M.Eduardo Julián
Conductor
on February 21, 2016 1:17pm
The Stabat Mater by Dvorak...hands down!!
We have done it several times and it is a great work for singers, soloists and orchestra...very satisfying.
Fr John
Applauded by an audience of 1
on February 24, 2016 5:11am
Sang this work about 20 years ago. It gives me shivers whenever I hear it!
on February 22, 2016 12:27pm
Medieval: Quam pulchra es by Dunstable
Renaissance: Lagrime d'amante al sepolcro dell'amata by Monteverdi; or Déploration sur la mort d'Ockeghem by Josquin
Baroque: Gloria in excelsis/Et in terra pax from the b minor Mass
Classical: Laudate Dominum from the Vesperae solennes de confessore by Mozart, or the Creation Mass by Haydn
Romantic: An die Heimat by Brahms (actually a quartet, but makes a great choral piece)
Modern: This is where things really start to spread out, but my list would have to include Nigra Sum by Casals (treble voices/piano or organ), My Shepherd Will Supply My Need arr. by Virgil Thomson, Toward an Unknown Region by Vaughan Willams, or (and I really mean this), Dan Forrest's arrangement of The First Noel (I think someone else mentioned this one as well)
Applauded by an audience of 1
on February 23, 2016 7:18am
"Abendlied" by Josef Rheinberger.
on February 23, 2016 2:17pm
SATB Choir, SATB ensemble, piano.  Choir and  ensemble echoing each other.  I had just starter directing at CLBI in Camrose, Alberta, Canada.  Had a fifty voice choir and no more than 20 copies of any choral work. But the Edmonton Public Library had a department that loaned out choral music, and they had about 60 copies of the Mass.  The ensemble had three very good voice and a soprano that could have and might have gone professional. Anyway, a beatiful work, although I think many of the you tube renditions are too slow.  
 
Rob Kemppainen
Maykalilly Music
on February 24, 2016 3:18pm
OK let's see, I have posted this in the wrong place twice and the second time without giving the title of the work.  Third time's the charm, I hope.
 
The most beautiful work I have ever conducted in the Kyrie from Beethoven's Mass in C Major.
 
SATB Choir, SATB ensemble, piano.  Choir and  ensemble echoing each other.  I had just starter directing at CLBI in Camrose, Alberta, Canada.  Had a fifty voice choir and no more than 20 copies of any choral work. But the Edmonton Public Library had a department that loaned out choral music, and they had about 60 copies of the Mass.  The ensemble had three very good voice and a soprano that could have and might have gone professional. Anyway, a beatiful work, although I think many of the you tube renditions are too slow. Special note.  At least in the tradition from which I come, the Kyrie is not a petition for forgiveness, that having already taken place in the confession which occurs first, before the service has begun.  The Kyrie is a prayer to God to show his mercy in providing the things necessary for life, health, strength, protection, food etc.  For these things, slow and somber are not needed, beside which, I think this Kyrie sounds better andantino as opposed to largo.
 
Rob Kemppainen
Maykalilly Music
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